With the game played by two million girls and women around the globe, Women’s Rugby World Cup is extending the reach of women’s rugby to new audiences, inspiring participation, interest and engagement.

Women’s Rugby World Cup 2014 was the seventh staging of the global tournament and the most outstanding event on and off the field to date. England were crowned world champions for the second time after beating Canada 21-9 in the final, while hosts France beat Ireland 25-18 in the third place play-off.

Previous Winners:

1991
Host: Wales
Venue: Cardiff
Winner: USA

1994
Host: Scotland
Venue: Edinburgh
Winner: England

1998
Host: Netherlands
Venue: Amsterdam
Winner: New Zealand

2002
Host: Spain
Venue: Barcelona
Winner: New Zealand

2006
Host: Canada
Venue: Edmonton
Winner: New Zealand

2010
Host: England
Venue: London
Winner: New Zealand

2014
Host: France
City: Paris
Winner: England

Women’s Rugby World Cup 2014 was the most competitive event to date with four-time defending champions New Zealand failing to make the semi-finals for the first time. Ireland created the biggest upset by beating New Zealand for the first time in their history, 17-14 in the pool stage to end the Black Ferns’ run of 20 consecutive victories in the tournament.

The tournament also achieved a record global broadcast audience for Women’s Rugby World Cup with the action being shown in more than 120 territories. The semi-final between France and Canada attracted more than 2.5 million viewers in France alone.

The World Rugby Council took the decision to move the next Women’s Rugby World Cup to 2017 rather than the hosting four years later in order to accommodate the Olympic Games in 2016 and Rugby World Cup Sevens in 2018.

In May 2015, the Irish Rugby Football Union was awarded the hosting of Women’s Rugby World Cup 2017. The event will take place from 9-26 August, 2017 at stadia in Dublin and Belfast.

The tournament comprises 12 teams in three pools of four with the pool winners plus the best runner-up progressing to the semi-finals.

Women’s Rugby World Cup is now regarded as a key event in the global sporting calendar that has grown from an invitational tournament to one with a robust qualification process, live broadcast, good attendances and an enthusiastic worldwide following.